The Guardian reports today that mobile phone company, T-Mobile, has put broadband internet access points along the line, and has wired up a fleet of trains to allow laptops to use wi-fi broadband over the air service while on board.

Published: 15 Feb 2005

The Guardian reports today that mobile phone company, T-Mobile, has put broadband internet access points along the line, and has wired up a fleet of trains to allow laptops to use wi-fi broadband over the air service while on board.

“In specially designated carriages anyone with a device that can use wi-fi, which is standard on most new laptops, will be able to connect to the web as if they were sitting at their desk,” states Richard Wray, Guardian Reporter. “The company claims the service should even work in tunnels.”

Travellers apparently already have access to wi-fi in many stationary locations, such as coffee shops, bars and airports, but the London-to-Brighton line will be Britain's first high-speed broadband route.

“T-Mobile said it would start a free trial of the service next month with a full launch in the summer,” continues Wray. “If it is a success the company plans to introduce it on other routes. “

Wi-fi is part of T-Mobile’s strategy to persuade consumers and business people to stay connected and spend money while on the move.

The organisation’s Chief Executive, René Obermann, has been cited as saying that the days of free or very cheap handsets for customers using pay-as-you-go are very limited. The company also believes it should reward customers who stay loyal rather than encouraging churn by subsidising handsets to make them cheaper for new customers.

"The focus of mobile has to shift firmly to encouraging new uses and new usage, and to building customer loyalty and customer lifetime value," the Guardian has quoted Obermann as commenting . "To do this, mobile should become simpler. Tariffs should be fairer. Pre-pay subsidy should go, and roaming rates should be simpler and more attractive."

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